Little Women

After being in my wish list for years, I read Little Women early this year. I wrote the review but it stayed in my draft for months. Sorry about that. Last week since we celebrated 182nd birthday of the amazing lady, Louisa Mary Alcott, I searched for my own post and found unpublished. So here we go.

First published in 1887 this book one of the best every girl could get their hands on. An amazing life journey of the March sisters, their way of living, the situational and moral challenges they face in day to day life and still how they enjoy living together. This is a classic, every parent should read to their children, every sibling should gift to their younger ones. There is a lot to learn, even though the story occurs in a patriarchal society of 19th century and the kids of now would have a little difficult time to understand the language and unfamiliar references.

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The story starts on a winter evening the four sisters, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy sitting together talking about Christmas gifts and how dreadful it is to be poor. The girls father is away in war, and mother helps in a community nursing center and its the girls who take care of the domestic life of the whole family. In today’s world, most of the moral lessons given by Jo, the central character, stands irrelevant and less feminist, though if the reader could put herself to the civil war time, every word of this amazing story makes so much sense. I am not giving away the story here, but its a medium long, vastly detailed and an outstanding piece of literature that you can’t miss.

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It says, Jo in this story is Louisa herself and the book is considered as biographically influenced. Louisa was an abolitionist and a feminist. Unlike the story where Jo marries, Louisa never married in real life and spend most of the time serving as a nurse. Irrespective of whether you read Little Women or not, the life story of Louisa Mary Alcott is truly inspirational like this quote of her’s,

” I am not afraid of the storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship.”

 

 

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One Comment Add yours

  1. inkbiotic says:

    It’s good to hear about a classic and get a reminder of some of the brilliant women of the past, thanks:)

    Liked by 1 person

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